most so called “fictional” movies are actually based on true events…”the hills have eyes” and the SAWNEY BEAN story…

The 2006 film,(a remake of a 1977 film) “the hills have eyes” & its sequels are based on a group of cannibalistic,barbaric deformed mutan-like people,dwelling in the secluded desert hills of new mexico who sadistically attack and mercilessly kill any poor passer by that happens to venture out in their midst. As the movie storyline goes, decades before, radioactive testing was conduced by the goverment in the new mexico desert hills which over time genetically affected the nearby residents who refused to leave the area and retreated to the desert. The government’s radio active testing program was had been canceled long before. Could there be actual people such these living undected in secluded areas in the u.s? (as well as other parts of the globe) it is not impossible. The goverment is very sinister and should not be trusted. There is so much being hidden from the public,so many undergroud projects being conducted by our beloved government,we’re just scratching the surface… “The hills have eyes” is loosely based on an actual family, a man, named “Sawney Bean was born in the late 14th century in a small East Lothian village not ten miles from Edinburgh. He began life as a hedger and ditcher, but, being prone to idleness and inclined towards dishonesty he ran away from home inclined as himself. Having no means to make a living they set up home in a sea cave in Galloway supporting themselves by robbing and murdering travellers and locals, and surviving on their victim’s pickled and salted flesh. In time their family grew to an incestuous gang of 46 sons, daughters, grandsons and granddaughters. Their reign of terror did not go unnoticed: for one, hundreds of people went missing over the years, and the Beans became so successful in their butchery that they cast unwanted limbs into the sea. These were washed up on distant and local beaches, much to the horror of the coastal communities. In time the areas reputation reached the ears of the authorities and, in these suspicious times, many innocent people were executed for Sawney’s crimes. The hardest hit were innkeepers as, more often than not, the missing person was last seen in an inn or lodgings: suspicion naturally falling on those who had seen them last. This happened on so many occasions that numerous innkeepers fled to take up other less risky occupations, and the area became a shunned and depopulated place.” the authorities and, in these suspicious times,many innocent people were executed for Sawney’s crimes. The hardest hit were innkeepers as, more often than not, the missing person was last seen in an inn or lodgings: suspicion naturally falling on those who had seen them last. This happened on so many occasions that numerous innkeepers fled to take up other less risky occupations, and the area became a shunned and depopulated place.”Sawney’s family had by now grown very large and started to attack larger groups, although never more than they thought they could overwhelm. They were confident they would not be discovered: the cave that they had chosen had kept them well hidden from prying eyes. The tide passed right into the mouth of the cave, which went almost a mile into the cliffs. It was estimated that in their 25- year reign of terror they had killed more than a thousand men women and children. They were finally discovered by fortunate chance: A man and his wife were returning from a local fayre on horseback – the man in front with his wife behind – when they were ambushed by the Bean family. The husband put a furious struggle with his sword and pistol and managed to plough through the villainous host. Unfortunately his wife lost her balance and fell from the horse, to be instantly butchered by the female cannibals, who ripped out her entrails and started to feast on her blood. Her horrified husband fought back even harder and was lucky that 30 or so other revellers from the fayre came along the path. The Bean family made a hasty retreat back to their hideout, as the man explained to the crowd what had happened. The husband went along with the group to Glasgow, magistrates were informed, who in turn told King James IV, who was so enthralled with the case that he took personal charge. Equipped with bloodhounds the King and a posse of 400 men made their way to the scene of the slaughter and the hunt began.””The bloodhounds get all the credit for the capture of Sawney Bean: the King’s men did not notice the well-hidden cave but the dogs could not ignore the strong smell of flesh that surrounded it. The men entered the cave and found a horrible scene: dried parts of human bodies were hanging all from the roof, pickled limbs lay in barrels, and all around piles of money dead lay in piles. The Beans made no attempt to escape all were caught alive and brought to Edinburgh in chains, where they were incarcerated in the Tollbooth, and the next day taken to Leith.”The people were horrified when they heard about the crimes of Sawney Bean and his family and decided to give them a punishment even more barbaric. The execution was a slow one the men bled to death after their hands and legs were cut off, and the women were burned alive after they were forced to watch the execution of the men. John Nicholson tells us about the execution as follows “…they all died without the least sign of repentance, but continued cursing and vending the most dreadful imprecations to the very last gasp of life.” the men. John Nicholson tells us about the execution as follows …”They all died without the least sign of repentance, but continued cursing and vending the most dreadful imprecations to the very last gasp of life.” The cave associated with Sawney and his nefarious clan is close to Ballantrae on Bennane head in Ayrshire, although other sea caves along the Ayrshire and Galloway coast have also been associated with the story. There are numerous written accounts that detail Sawney and his family.

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